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leo

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La définition du mot "leo":
rate 1. anagram ole
rate 2. Low Earth Orbit
rate 3. n (not after the) (plural) Leos - the fifth sign of the the zodiac, relating to the period 23 July to August 22, represented by a lion, or a person born during this period or a group of stars He was born under Leo (= during this period) . We're both typical Leos.
rate 4. Low Earth Orbit
rate 5. Low Earth Orbit (French: Orbite basse)
rate 6. Proposed system of personal telecommunications based on communication via a number of satellites in low orbit. The best known of these proposal is called the "Iridium" project.
rate 7. Latin: Lion, in astronomy, zodiacal constellation lying between Cancer and Virgo, at about 10 hours 30 minutes right ascension (the coordinate of the celestial sphere analogous to longitude on the Earth) and 15 north declination (angular distance north of the celestial equator). Regulus (Alpha Leonis), the brightest star, is of the first magnitude. The November meteor shower called the Leonid has its radiant or point of apparent origin, in Leo. In astrology, Leo is the fifth sign of the zodiac, considered as governing the period c. July 23c. August 22. Its representation as a lion is usually linked with the Nemean lion slain by Heracles (Hercules).
rate 8. born May 23, 1873, Lissa, Posen, Prussia; died November 2, 1956, London, Eng. Prussian-Polish rabbi, spiritual leader of German Jewry during the Nazi period. After earning his Ph.D. in philosophy at the University of Berlin, he served as a rabbi in Silesia, Düsseldorf and Berlin, becoming the leading liberal Jewish religious thinker of his time. He synthesized Neo-Kantianism and rabbinic ethics in The Essence of Judaism (1905) and considered the Christian gospels as rabbinic literature in The Gospel as a Document of Jewish Religious History (1938). He negotiated with the Nazis to buy time for the German Jews; finally arrested, he was sent to the Theresienstadt concentration camp, where he wrote and lectured on Plato and Immanuel Kant. Liberated in 1945 on the day before he was to be executed, he settled in England.
rate 9. born November 14, 1863, Ghent, Belg. died February 23, 1944, Beacon, New York, United States Belgian-born United States industrial chemist. A teacher of chemistry in Belgium, he immigrated to the United States in 1889. He invented Velox, the first commercially successful photographic paper, which could be developed under artificial light and sold the rights to George Eastman for $1 million in 1899. His search for a substitute for shellac led to the discovery in 1909 of a method of forming a hard thermosetting plastic, which he named Bakelite, produced from formaldehyde and phenol. His discovery helped found the modern plastics industry.
rate 10. born November 14, 1863, Ghent, Belg. died February 23, 1944, Beacon, New York, United States Belgian-born United States industrial chemist. A teacher of chemistry in Belgium, he immigrated to the United States in 1889. He invented Velox, the first commercially successful photographic paper, which could be developed under artificial light and sold the rights to George Eastman for $1 million in 1899. His search for a substitute for shellac led to the discovery in 1909 of a method of forming a hard thermosetting plastic, which he named Bakelite, produced from formaldehyde and phenol. His discovery helped found the modern plastics industry.
rate 11. born February 24, 1831, Berlin-Charlottenburg, Prussia; died February 6, 1899, near Crossen-an-der-Oder, Ger. German soldier and politician. A distinguished soldier, he served as chief of the admiralty (1883–88). He succeeded Otto von Bismarck as Germany's imperial chancellor (1890–94) and Prussian minister president (1890–92). His achievements included an Anglo-German agreement concerning spheres of influence in Africa, commercial treaties with Austria, Romania and other states and the reorganization of the German army.
rate 12. born February 24, 1831, Berlin-Charlottenburg, Prussia; died February 6, 1899, near Crossen-an-der-Oder, Ger. German soldier and politician. A distinguished soldier, he served as chief of the admiralty (1883–88). He succeeded Otto von Bismarck as Germany's imperial chancellor (1890–94) and Prussian minister president (1890–92). His achievements included an Anglo-German agreement concerning spheres of influence in Africa, commercial treaties with Austria, Romania and other states and the reorganization of the German army.
rate 13. born February 21, 1836, Saint-Germain-du-Val, France; died January 16, 1891, Paris; French composer. He studied at the Paris Conservatoire and worked as a church organist and as accompanist and chorus master at the Paris Opéra. Though he composed almost 30 operas, operettas and ballets, as well as many choral pieces, he is remembered today for three works: the ballets Coppélia (1870) and Sylvia (1876) and the opera Lakmé (1883).
rate 14. born February 21, 1836, Saint-Germain-du-Val, France; died January 16, 1891, Paris; French composer. He studied at the Paris Conservatoire and worked as a church organist and as accompanist and chorus master at the Paris Opéra. Though he composed almost 30 operas, operettas and ballets, as well as many choral pieces, he is remembered today for three works: the ballets Coppélia (1870) and Sylvia (1876) and the opera Lakmé (1883).
rate 15. born July 27, 1905, West Springfield, Mass., United States died October 7, 1991, Palm Springs, Calif. United States baseball player and manager. Durocher played for various teams from 1928 to 1938, distinguishing himself by his sharp fielding at shortstop. He gained notoriety as the cheeky, contentious manager of the Brooklyn Dodgers (1939–46, 1948); he was suspended from managing for the entire 1947 season for "conduct detrimental to baseball," a vague charge that was based upon Durocher's reputation for gambling and fast living. He managed the New York Giants 1948–55, left to become a commentator, returned to the game as a coach for the Los Angeles Dodgers (1961–64) and managed the Chicago Cubs (1966–72) and the Houston Astros (1972–73). He is credited with the observation "Nice guys finish last" (what he actually said was, "The nice guys over there are in seventh place").
rate 16. born July 27, 1905, West Springfield, Mass., United States died October 7, 1991, Palm Springs, Calif. United States baseball player and manager. Durocher played for various teams from 1928 to 1938, distinguishing himself by his sharp fielding at shortstop. He gained notoriety as the cheeky, contentious manager of the Brooklyn Dodgers (1939–46, 1948); he was suspended from managing for the entire 1947 season for "conduct detrimental to baseball," a vague charge that was based upon Durocher's reputation for gambling and fast living. He managed the New York Giants 1948–55, left to become a commentator, returned to the game as a coach for the Los Angeles Dodgers (1961–64) and managed the Chicago Cubs (1966–72) and the Houston Astros (1972–73). He is credited with the observation "Nice guys finish last" (what he actually said was, "The nice guys over there are in seventh place").
rate 17. orig. Esaki Reiona; born March 12, 1925, &#014C;saka, Japan; Japanese physicist. In 1956 he became chief physicist of the Sony Corp. and in 1960 he was awarded an IBM fellowship for further research in the U.S., subsequently joining IBM's research laboratories in Yorktown, New York He worked intensively on tunneling in semiconductors and constructed the tunnel diode, which found broad applications in computers and other devices. He shared a 1973 Nobel Prize with Ivar Giaever (b. 1929) and Brian Josephson.
rate 18. born October 26, 1564, Nürnberg; died June 8, 1612, Frankfurt am Main; German composer and organist. Born into a family of organists, he studied with Andrea and Giovanni Gabrieli in Venice. He served as chamber organist to the Fugger family of Augsburg (1586–ƹ 1600). His compositions became widely known and were granted copyright protection by the emperor in 1591. A Protestant, he eventually left Catholic Augsburg to take posts in Nürnberg, Ulm and Dresden. He is best known for his sacred Latin choral music, including masses, psalms and motets, but he also composed Italian madrigals, German part-songs (several became Protestant hymns) and instrumental music.
rate 19. known as Leo the Isaurian; born 675, Germanicia, Commagene, Syria; died June 18, 742, Constantinople; Byzantine emperor (717–41), founder of the Isaurian dynasty. A high-ranking military commander, he seized the throne with the help of Arab armies who hoped to subjugate the Byzantine Empire. He then successfully defended Constantinople against the Arabs (717–718). Having crowned his son Constantine V coemperor (720), Leo used his son's marriage to cement an alliance with the Khazars. Victory over the Arabs at Akroïnos (740) was crucial in preventing their conquest of Asia Minor. Leo issued an important legal code, the Ecloga (726). His policy of iconoclasm (730), which banned the use of sacred images in churches, engendered a century of conflict within the empire and further strained relations with the pope in Rome.
rate 20. orig. Vincenzo Gioacchino Pecci; born March 2, 1810, Carpineto Romano, Papal States; died July 20, 1903, Rome; Pope (1878–1903). Born into the Italian nobility, he was ordained a priest in 1837 and entered the diplomatic service of the Papal States. He was appointed bishop of Perugia in 1846 and was named a cardinal in 1853. He was elected pope in 1878, and, despite his advanced age and frail health, he directed the church for a quarter of a century. Like his predecessor, Pius IX, he opposed Freemasonry and secular liberalism, but he brought a new spirit to the papacy by adopting a conciliatory attitude toward civil governments and taking a more positive view of scientific progress.; Leo XIII, 1878; The Bettmann Archive
rate 21. orig. Giovanni de' Medici; born Dec. 1, 1475, Florence; died Dec. 1, 1521, Rome; Pope (1513–21), one of the most extravagant of the Renaissance pontiffs. The second son of Lorenzo de' Medici, he was educated at his father's court in Florence and at the University of Pisa. He was named a cardinal in 1492 and in 1494 he was exiled from Florence by the revolt of Girolamo Savonarola. He returned in 1500 and soon consolidated Medici control of the city. As pope, he became a patron of the arts, accelerating construction of St. Peter's Basilica. He strengthened the papacy's political power in Europe, but his lavish spending depleted his treasury. He discouraged reforms at the fifth Lateran Council and he responded inadequately to the Reformation, excommunicating Martin Luther in 1521 and failing to address the need for change, a lapse that signaled the end of the unified Western church.
rate 22. Latin: "Lion" In astronomy, the constellation lying between Cancer and Virgo; in astrology, the fifth sign of the zodiac, governing approximately the period July 23–August 22. Its symbol, a lion, has been associated with the Nemean lion slain by Heracles. The Nemean lion was considered invulnerable because its skin was impervious to arrows, but Heracles battered it to death with a club. Zeus put the lion in the sky as a constellation.
rate 23. Baeck Leo
rate 24. Baekeland Leo Hendrik
rate 25. Caprivi Georg Leo count von
rate 26. Durocher Leo Ernest
rate 27. Esaki Leo
rate 28. Hassler Hans Leo
rate 29. Leo I Saint
rate 30. Leo the Great
rate 31. Leo III
rate 32. Leo the Isaurian
rate 33. Leo IX Saint
rate 34. Leo XIII
rate 35. Leo X
rate 36. Mankiewicz Joseph Leo
rate 37. Szilard Leo
rate 38. Weldon Leo Teagarden
rate 39. Tolstoy Leo;
rate 40. born February 11, 1909, Wilkes-Barre, Pa., United States died February 5, 1993, Mount Kisco, New York United States film director, producer and screenwriter. He wrote scripts for Paramount from 1929 and later produced movies such as The Philadelphia Story (1940) and Woman of the Year (1942). Known for his witty, urbane dialogue and memorable characters, he wrote and directed films such as A Letter to Three Wives (1949, Academy Awards for best director and screenplay), All About Eve (1950, Academy Awards for best picture, director and screenplay) and The Barefoot Contessa (1954) and directed Julius Caesar (1953), Suddenly Last Summer (1959) and the disastrously expensive Cleopatra (1963). His older brother, Herman (1897–1953), was a screenwriter and a famous wit, best remembered as the principal author of Citizen Kane (1941, Academy Award).
rate 41. born February 11, 1898, Budapest, Hung., Austria-Hungary; died May 30, 1964, La Jolla, Calif., United States Hungarian-born United States physicist. He taught at the University of Berlin (1922–33), then fled to England (1934–37) and the U.S., where he worked at the University of Chicago from 1942. In 1929 he established the relation between entropy and transfer of information and in 1934 he helped develop the first method of separating isotopes of artificial radioactive elements. He helped Enrico Fermi conduct the first sustained nuclear chain reaction and construct the first nuclear reactor. In 1939 he was instrumental in establishing the Manhattan Project, in which he helped develop the atomic bomb. After the first use of the bomb, he promoted the peaceful uses of atomic energy and the control of nuclear weapons, founding the Council for a Livable World. In 1959 he received the Atoms for Peace Award.
rate 42. orig. Weldon Leo Teagarden; born August 20, 1905, Vernon, Texas, United States died January 15, 1964, New Orleans, La. United States jazz trombonist and singer. He worked with two of the most popular bands of the early swing era, those of Ben Pollack (1928–33) and Paul Whiteman (1933–38). After leading his own group (1938–47), he joined Louis Armstrong's All Stars and recorded and toured with them internationally until 1951. Teagarden's trademark relaxed, bluesy approach was evident in both his playing and singing, his engaging Texas accent seeming to colour both.
rate 43. Russian Lev Nikolayevich, Count Tolstoy; born September 9, 1828, Yasnaya Polyana, Tula province, Russian Empire; died November 20, 1910, Astapovo, Ryazan province; Russian writer, one of the world's greatest novelists. The scion of prominent aristocrats, Tolstoy spent much of his life at his family estate of Yasnaya Polyana. After a somewhat dissolute youth, he served in the army and traveled in Europe before returning home and starting a school for peasant children. He was already known as a brilliant writer for the short stories in Sevastopol Sketches (1855–56) and the novel The Cossacks (1863) when War and Peace (1865–69) established him as Russia's preeminent novelist. Set during the Napoleonic Wars, it examines the lives of a large group of characters, centring on the partly autobiographical figure of the spiritually questing Pierre. Its structure, with its flawless placement of complex characters in a turbulent historical setting, is regarded as one of the great technical achievements in the history of the Western novel. His other great novel, Anna Karenina (1875–77), focuses on an aristocratic woman who deserts her husband for a lover and on the search for meaning by another autobiographical character, Levin. After its publication Tolstoy underwent a spiritual crisis and turned to a form of Christian anarchism. Advocating simplicity and nonviolence, he devoted himself to social reform. His later works include The Death of Ivan Ilich (1886), often considered the greatest novella in Russian literature and What Is Art? (1898), which condemns fashionable aestheticism and celebrates art's moral and religious functions. He lived like a peasant on his great estate, practicing a radical asceticism. Finding his marriage unbearable, he departed suddenly for the local railway station, where he contracted a fatal pneumonia in the cold.; Leo Tolstoy. The Bettmann Archive
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